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How large my day would be if I lived from fraction to fraction of a moment – an act for which I coined the phrase ‘living from pole to pole’. This was a strange question which popped up inside my head while I commenced my walk from my study to the main gate, walking step in step with my body, attuned to my attention, doing my best to not arrive at the gate, doing my best to not be in any next. The distance between my study and the main gate, tentatively, is hundred and fifty feet. My relatively  extra ‘present’ state of being made the walk ‘sense’ lengthier. One may argue and claim – ‘well, a hundred and fifty feet is a hundred and fifty feet. How one experiences the distance is subjective. Besides, there will always be an element of comparison. Most likely, one experiences a hundred and fifty feet as fifty feet based on past experiences.’

Yes, I thought; in my everyday life I invariably experience a hundred and fifty feet as non-existent. There is no study, there is no distance, there is no hundred and fifty feet, there is no main gate. This world is NOT from my father’s point of view who died on the 4th of April 2012. The world IS when ‘I AM’.

But, I thought, my concern is the ‘experience of the experience’ WHEN I EXPERIENCE the distance between my study and the main gate and not when I am lost. How would I ‘experience this experience’ when I walk from ‘pole to pole’, missing not a fraction of an inch, sensing my walk as I walked, arriving not, going not, from my study to my gate?

My mind, the biggest obstacle to walking from ‘pole to pole’, would not let me walk like this, and came up with an answer – ‘traverse through infinity.’

Logically this sounds so correct, I thought, because when I am in the moment, not going or arriving in the next, there is no next. There is no before. And in the absence of before or next there is notime. ‘Here’ I walk in notime and yet I am in a perennial moment. Rather, this is more like walking hand in hand with ‘time’ like two trains not moving in relation to each other while moving at the same pace, in the same direction, on parallel tracks. Time will obviously stop in relation to me. The time it will take for me to arrive at my gate will be timeless, hence the distance between my study and my gate will be infinite.

But to sound practical in the wake of my past forgetfulness and mechanical behavior pattern, I decided to safely deduct – the distance will be like a thousand miles. And I thought, ‘once I transcend my limitations I will experience a hundred and fifty feet as infinity’.

the-persistence-of-memory-1931-jpglarge

(Painting Credit: “The Persistence of Memory” by Salvador Dali)

Our four dimensional world seems alive and vibrant because of the element of ‘time’, which, needless to say, is Life that walks step in step with death. The world stops when time stops, and the time can only stop relatively. My experience of time can differ from others’ experience of time. My experience of one time will differ from other times and with this difference the length I would cover within a physical time will also differ. Everything is so relative here, I safely concluded No time is un-relative. Notime is the safest place to BE. Actually, BEING has to be un-relative in a space which is ever Here.

Time-notime

(Time-Notime)

This state sounds viable. But where is ‘here’?

(‘It’s hard to be Here’, a friend told me the other day.)

‘Let’s try not being ‘there’, the question delivered me the answer. Questions are loaded with answers.

The question came forward with a precise answer: ‘UNDO every ‘there’.

Yes, I felt euphoric. I can arrive nowhere other than ‘here’ if all ‘there’s’ are undone. I knew.

‘Believe me the day will turn into 1000 years’, I said for my own consumption.

‘Tell me’, I asked myself – ‘do I find it hard to be ‘here’, this moment, undoing ‘there’?

And there?

And then?

And so on?

‘This is what living from moment to moment is and there is no other moment to live’, I self proclaimed.

Living from fraction to fraction of a moment is potential enough to turn a day into infinity.

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